Simply teaching the Bible, simply

This is our Podcast. We're a Bible believing Church meeting at Barncroft Primary School, Havant, Hampshire, UK

Genesis 1 6-19


This teaching is our third session in our verse-by-verse study of the Book of Genesis by pastor Barry – given as part of our family service on 29th January 2017. We live in a world where ‘science’ has proven that God does not exist and the Bible is nothing more than ancient folklore – right? Well, actually no. True science and the Bible will never be in disagreement because they both have the same author! As Dr Chuck Missler states, “The more you know about modern science, the more comfortable you become with the opening chapters of Genesis!” This is certainly true in regard to the ‘firmament’ that God creates on day two. The Hebrew word ‘raqia’ actually means a solid expanse. It is from the Latin word ‘firmamentum’ we get our English word that itself implies firm. As we see in this study, the ‘firmament’ is a word that describes two distinct things: firstly a ‘layer’ or ‘canopy’ that divides the water on the surface of the Earth with water that sits above, and is seemingly held in place by, this ancient water canopy that surrounded the ancient world. There is a surprising amount of scientific support for this idea. The second use of the word ‘firmament’ is to describe ‘space’. But how can space be described as ‘firm’ or a ‘solid expanse’? We see in this study that the Bible hints at something science has only recently caught up with! You can listen to the audio on this web page, or save it for later listening. We have also made available all of the Powerpoint slides (in PDF format) used by pastor Barry during this study. For further study, study notes are uploaded each week as part of the Pastor’s Blog section of this web-site. The blog accompanying this study can be found at: We hope and pray this study will bless you and encourage you to undertake your own personal study and adventure in God’s Word!



Filetype: MP3 - Size: 10.42MB - Duration: 44:08 m (32 kbps 44100 Hz)